Notes

MacOS shows the App Switcher by default only on the display where the Dock was last displayed. If you're using a multi monitor setup this is, at least for me, a little bit annoying. I couldn't find any setting in the UI for changing this behaviour. Thankfully it can be done using the CLI.

To display the App switcher on all monitors you need to run the following commands.

$ defaults write com.apple.Dock appswitcher-all-displays -bool true
$ killall Dock

Changing it back to the default behaviour can be achieved using the following commands.

$ defaults write com.apple.Dock appswitcher-all-displays -bool false
$ killall Dock

found via Show macOS app switcher across all monitors


from around 03:48 in the video:

[...] It's a cool case study because two reasons. 1. it highlights something I say often on the show which is when it comes to organizing work especially in teams start with the process first. What makes the most sense for us to organize our work and then 2. figure out what tools you need to implemented that. [...]

The above quote from the video is basically exact the same thing with which I try to convince people who start solving a problem by focussing on a tool instead of the process. It's always about the process and the people, not about the tooling. The latter can be solved once the processes are defined.


As of yesterday this little blog does support webmentions.

Basically you do have a small form just at the end of every article/note which you can use to send a webmention. Of course it is also possible to send it without the form. Just send it to /api/webmention.


The problem is this: if you use Face ID or Touch ID on your device (and you almost certainly should), what happens if law enforcement (or anyone else for that matter) takes your device and physically forces you to unlock it biometrically? There is some legal precedent supporting the notion that police can force you to do this, but can’t force you to provide them with a passcode or passphrase.

Here are two essential things everyone should know.


... In the emails to developers that surfaced last month, Apple said it would pull apps that had not been updated in a "significant amount of time"—a vague statement that led to the usual developer complaint that Apple's rules appear opaque at best, or arbitrary and capricious at worst. Apple's new press release pulls back the curtain on that policy, at least a little bit. For Apple's purposes, it turns out that a "significant amount of time" specifically means three years. ...

So there has been an update provided by Apple regarding this.


... It’s a hard problem and I can see the upsides of Apple automating the clearing of truly abandoned apps from the App Store, but it seems like there ought to be a way for developers of not-updated-for-a-while apps and games to just log into Apple’s developer portal and hit a button to vouch that they still work and don’t need an update. ...

My guess is that this will become a huge topic in the next weeks because from a developer perspective it doesn't make sense to touch a perfectly fine running piece of software. On the other hand I can also understand why Apple is trying to "clean" the app store. The above quoted suggested compromise could be a good way to handle, in any case a better approach than the one Apple is currently pursuing.


The ALM Accelerator for Power Platform includes a canvas app that sits on top of Azure DevOps Pipelines and Git source control. The app provides a simplified interface for makers to regularly export the components in their Power Platform Solutions to source control and create deployment requests to have their work reviewed before deploying to target environments.

Very interesting to see that a platform that also targets citizen developers now gets more and more ALM tooling. My guess that professional developers were not happy with the given possibilities before. But I think that this is a good thing.


This year's Microsoft Ignite was only a virtual event as it was last year. There were so many announcements this year, even more than last year. But that's just my personal feeling.

To get a summary of all news announced at Ignite 2021 one can always look at the so called book of news provided by Microsoft.

Microsoft Ignite Book of News


It's a perfect episode among many great episodes. The high-concept risk paid off, and it still holds up a decade (!) later as dexterous writing and effortless comedy that allowed each actor to be in their element.

For me Community is definitely one of the best series I've ever watched. Especially the nice combination of empathy displayed combined with a nice (dark) sense of humour made it so special for me. I definitely agree with the author of the article that this episode is the best one of the series.


Gartner quadrant

Azure Integration Services (AIS), comprising of Logic Apps, API Management, Service Bus, Event Grid, and Data Factory, helps customers connect applications, data, and services, on-premises and in the cloud. Azure Integration Services helps businesses boost productivity and increase agility with highly secure automated workflows and create new revenue opportunities with an API driven partner and developer ecosystem.

Being an Azure Solutions Architect myself and especially interested in data flows between systems, I can totally see why Microsoft has been put into this quadrant. But what really amazes me is that AWS doesn't appear in this classification at all.

Of course, AWS does not have this deep integration with numerous services as is possible with Microsoft's connectors, e.g. M365. Nevertheless, I personally see that AWS is also strong in this segment (integration based on PaaS) and should therefore also be represented in this classification.

What are your thoughts on this? Please feel free to get in touch to share your thoughts.