The problem is this: if you use Face ID or Touch ID on your device (and you almost certainly should), what happens if law enforcement (or anyone else for that matter) takes your device and physically forces you to unlock it biometrically? There is some legal precedent supporting the notion that police can force you to do this, but can’t force you to provide them with a passcode or passphrase.

Here are two essential things everyone should know.


... In the emails to developers that surfaced last month, Apple said it would pull apps that had not been updated in a "significant amount of time"—a vague statement that led to the usual developer complaint that Apple's rules appear opaque at best, or arbitrary and capricious at worst. Apple's new press release pulls back the curtain on that policy, at least a little bit. For Apple's purposes, it turns out that a "significant amount of time" specifically means three years. ...

So there has been an update provided by Apple regarding this.


... It’s a hard problem and I can see the upsides of Apple automating the clearing of truly abandoned apps from the App Store, but it seems like there ought to be a way for developers of not-updated-for-a-while apps and games to just log into Apple’s developer portal and hit a button to vouch that they still work and don’t need an update. ...

My guess is that this will become a huge topic in the next weeks because from a developer perspective it doesn't make sense to touch a perfectly fine running piece of software. On the other hand I can also understand why Apple is trying to "clean" the app store. The above quoted suggested compromise could be a good way to handle, in any case a better approach than the one Apple is currently pursuing.


If you are working as a consultant, software engineer, or software architect you're often given the task to find a solution for a problem. Most of the time it is a business process/problem from a customer. The customer can be your own employer or a client who asked for your support.

From my point of view, one if not the most important aspect of this is to get your own ego out of the way for finding a solution. But there are also other topics that are also important in this context and go hand in hand with getting your ego out of the way.

Have customer obsession

In the end, it is the customer who will pay your bills. So always keep your customer in mind when trying to find a solution. With this knowledge, it may make more sense to implement a solution that generates less revenue as a first step. However, from the resulting customer satisfaction, it can then become a more satisfied long-term relationship with the customer.

Many roads lead to Rome

There is more than one acceptable solution to solve a problem. It is totally fine when the preferred one was not brought up by you. As already mentioned, get your ego out of the way. It is not a question of being right or wrong, but always of finding the best possible solution.

Agree to disagree

In the end, someone must decide which solution will be implemented. Sometimes it can happen that not all people involved are of the same opinion. In this case, someone must recognize when disagreement is needed to proceed. But also, in this case, you should be sensible to acknowledge when it is not your solution which is the best one for the specific problem.

KISS

More often people try to come up with the fanciest solution for a problem. Even though the fancy one might solve the problem it also might be unnecessarily complex. Habitually keep in mind that a solution should be KISS.

Accept things for what they are

Often you will find situations where you need to use some third part tooling. And sometimes things are not useable in a way which you might prefer. I've caught myself more than once trying to then change something about it or build around it to have a way that I personally like. In the end, though, it was always easier to accept and use things the way someone else built them, especially when they provide a fit at around 80 percent. Simply don't waste time on something that doesn't add value in the end.

Frugality

Frugality is something that often comes to people's minds when they think about not buying a coffee at their favorite café. But from my point of view, it is also something when trying to create a solution. Most of the time it can be done more inexpensively. For this, you need to talk with your customer and see where you agree on a compromise. You simply don't need to create the fanciest solution just to pamper your ego. It is the outcome for the customer which counts.


The ALM Accelerator for Power Platform includes a canvas app that sits on top of Azure DevOps Pipelines and Git source control. The app provides a simplified interface for makers to regularly export the components in their Power Platform Solutions to source control and create deployment requests to have their work reviewed before deploying to target environments.

Very interesting to see that a platform that also targets citizen developers now gets more and more ALM tooling. My guess that professional developers were not happy with the given possibilities before. But I think that this is a good thing.


This year's Microsoft Ignite was only a virtual event as it was last year. There were so many announcements this year, even more than last year. But that's just my personal feeling.

To get a summary of all news announced at Ignite 2021 one can always look at the so called book of news provided by Microsoft.

Microsoft Ignite Book of News


It's a perfect episode among many great episodes. The high-concept risk paid off, and it still holds up a decade (!) later as dexterous writing and effortless comedy that allowed each actor to be in their element.

For me Community is definitely one of the best series I've ever watched. Especially the nice combination of empathy displayed combined with a nice (dark) sense of humour made it so special for me. I definitely agree with the author of the article that this episode is the best one of the series.


Gartner quadrant

Azure Integration Services (AIS), comprising of Logic Apps, API Management, Service Bus, Event Grid, and Data Factory, helps customers connect applications, data, and services, on-premises and in the cloud. Azure Integration Services helps businesses boost productivity and increase agility with highly secure automated workflows and create new revenue opportunities with an API driven partner and developer ecosystem.

Being an Azure Solutions Architect myself and especially interested in data flows between systems, I can totally see why Microsoft has been put into this quadrant. But what really amazes me is that AWS doesn't appear in this classification at all.

Of course, AWS does not have this deep integration with numerous services as is possible with Microsoft's connectors, e.g. M365. Nevertheless, I personally see that AWS is also strong in this segment (integration based on PaaS) and should therefore also be represented in this classification.

What are your thoughts on this? Please feel free to get in touch to share your thoughts.


I experience a lot of random errors on Azure. Code Functions will randomly fail to trigger until redeployed, builds pushed into Oryx will not always successfully complete. There isn’t the feeling of robustness with it that you get elsewhere.

I also see things described in this post from time to time. Especially random error messages and inconsistent behaviour is something which really can drive you nuts.

Therefore, I agree with the conclusion the Microsoft should spent some time serious engineering on both security and availability.


"Our recommendation is to not buy new Chinese phones, and to get rid of those already purchased as fast as reasonably possible," Defence Deputy Minister Margiris Abukevicius told reporters in introducing the report.

Cheap devices come at a cost...